Proposition Papers

A vulnerability and adaptation assessment had been undertaken to address the different concerns resulting from the varied CC impacts such as storm surges, sea level rise, increased precipitation, increase in temperature and strong typhoons and how will these affect the lives of the residents and the city’s development in general. Part of the assessment was the identification of “highly vulnerable” barangays or “Hot- Spot Areas” which resulted in the selection of (5) “pilot barangays” to showcase demonstration projects in the (4) areas identified and agreed upon during the city multi-stakeholders consultation meeting. These areas are: Housing and Basic Infrastructure, Livelihood, Environmental Management and Climate & Disaster Risk Reduction. Multi-sectoral Issue Working Groups (IWGs) had been created which spearheaded the accomplishment of the following planned outputs:

1. Housing & Basic Infrastructure
a) Local minimum standards for CC-resilient socialized housing structures developed and adopted;
b) A Housing Evaluation Tool Kit based on the standards for CC and disaster-resilient socialized housing developed and applied;
c) Community and local leaders made aware of the agreed minimum standards through “Community Action Planning “ conducted in the (5) pilot barangays; and
d) Retrofitted vulnerable housing units in the pilot barangays based on the agreed local minimum standards.

2. Livelihood

a) Communities made aware of the vulnerability of their livelihood activities through “Livelihood Baselining “ activities taking into account seasonal impacts of climate change in select communities using baselining tools;
b) Livelihood plans/strategies in the pilot communities developed through “Barangay Profiling”; and
c) Select members of the vulnerable households trained on new adaptive skills through partnership with the Technical Skills and Development Authority (TESDA) such as on-the-job house retrofitting, food processing, etc., and provision of livelihood starter kits.

3. Environmental Management

a) Increased knowledge imparted among the communities and the City Government on implementing CC- mitigation responsive projects with focus on efficient energy use and
transport policy through the adoption of local policies on energy-efficient lightings and tricycle motor conversion;
b) Street lights replaced with energy-efficient lights adopted through an Executive Order; and
c) A policy or program on the conversion or replacement of 2-stroke tricycle engines to the more efficient and emission reducing 4-stroke motor engines developed and adopted by the City Government.

4. Climate and Disaster Risk Reduction

a) Working knowledge on CBDRRM and CCA increased in the pilot barangays through effective Information, Education and Communication (IEC) strategies such as social artistry programs/activities;
b) Ideal structural and facilities design of schools also used as Evacuation Centers (ECs) developed and agreed among local stakeholders;
c) Partnerships between and among the community, academe and the City Government on the care and retrofitting of schools used as ECs, forged through a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA); and
d) A community school cum evacuation center retrofitted based on the agreed ideal/modular design.

Approaches/Strategies
The implementation scheme adopted for the demo projects considered the participatory and consultative approaches to development. In the case of the Housing & Basic Infrastructure, for example, practitioners and stakeholders discussed and developed local minimum standards for socialized housing and “Community Action Planning for House Retrofitting and Site Planning”; the Livelihood Demo Project utilized the “Livelihood Baselining” and “Barangay Profiling” activities involving Barangay Officers and stakeholders to determine the vulnerability of their livelihood activities; the Environmental Demo Project conducted orientations and dialogues among different sectors on the different programs of the project such as the use of energy-efficient and environment-friendly lighting fixtures, tricycle motor conversion and best practices in environmental management; while the DRR Demo Project resorted to community mobilization and social preparation activities to increase community awareness and ownership of the various initiatives and interventions.

Each of the Demo Project has its own Information, Education and Communication (IEC) schemes to increase stakeholders’ participation, awareness, ownership and acceptance of the initiatives.

Capacity- Building and Empowerment
Corollary to the strategic approaches adopted to implement the project is the empowerment of both the project implementors and beneficiaries through local and international trainings. The quality and expertise of project implementors as well as the transformation of beneficiaries’ mindset from “dole-out” mentality to developmental and pro-active attitude have been identified as key ingredients to successful project implementation under the partnership. In addition to the various trainings conducted by the Consultants of the UN HABITAT, the project implementors as well as the project beneficiaries were exposed to trainings related to climate change, project evaluation, leadership and governance, community development, best practices sharing and benchmarking, development planning and other capability building activities.

Role of the City Government

As stipulated in the AoC, the City Government is mainly responsible for the implementation of the demo projects to include monitoring, evaluation and conduct of activities on ground. Each demo project has assigned lead person and support partners. It adheres to the participatory approach in the planning and implementation of projects and activities up to the community level. Its CC Project Office is responsible for over-all coordination of activities and initiatives as well as drafting and submission of periodic reports to the project principals. The City Government also involves its concerned Department Heads and other Officers in the respective Issue Working Groups (IWG) as counterpart to the over-all requirements of the project.

Financials

The total budget allocated to the project is P 9.5 M. Out of this fund, an amount equivalent to approximately P7.8 have been disbursed as of this date for both the (4) demo projects and general fund, pending payments for obligated/committed funds up to the project’s termination on December 18, 2011. The City Government has a total counterpart of about P4.2 M in line with the technical supervision (imputed cost of services) of its key technical staff for the 3- year period.
As expected, there are actual expenditures per budget item which exceeded the budgeted amount, while other budget items experienced minimal surpluses. These surpluses were used to offset other budget items which were “in the red”. Details of the financial report are incorporated in the Audited Financial Statements prepared by an accredited External Auditor.

Over-all Assesssment

Like any other project, the Climate Change Project implemented by LGU Sorsogon City has its own “highs” and “lows”. But on the whole, it is one of the few successful projects funded by foreign donors in the country. The Sorsogon Model is in fact recognized by the local and international communities. This can be attributed to the uncompromising leadership demonstrated by the LGU, the developmental assistance of the UN HABITAT, the cooperation and commitment of local partners and the active involvement and vigilance of the multi-sectoral stakeholders. One very significant impact of the project is the mindset transformation of Sorsoganons in general, from a “laid back” attitude to a pro-active and developmental consciousness. Another is the empowerment of the project implementors and beneficiaries through local and international trainings on climate change, effective leadership, project management, governance skills, community development, development planning, best practices sharing and benchmarking, and other development-oriented capability building activities.
Along the way, various setbacks and constraints had been encountered, but because of the tenacity and perseverance of the LGU leadership, the project implementors and the local stakeholders, the project was completed very satisfactorily “with flying colors”, as one of the international visitors put it. But we cannot “rest on our laurels” because there are still unfinished businesses especially with regard to monitoring and evaluation of “grassroots” impacts and replication of “best practices” generated by the project, in other areas.

A vulnerability and adaptation assessment had been undertaken to address the different concerns resulting from the varied CC impacts such as storm surges, sea level rise, increased precipitation, increase in temperature and strong typhoons and how will these affect the lives of the residents and the city’s development in general. Part of the assessment was the identification of “highly vulnerable” barangays or “Hot- Spot Areas” which resulted in the selection of (5) “pilot barangays” to showcase demonstration projects in the (4) areas identified and agreed upon during the city multi-stakeholders consultation meeting. These areas are: Housing and Basic Infrastructure, Livelihood, Environmental Management and Climate & Disaster Risk Reduction. Multi-sectoral Issue Working Groups (IWGs) had been created which spearheaded the accomplishment of the following planned outputs:

1. Housing & Basic Infrastructure
a) Local minimum standards for CC-resilient socialized housing structures developed and adopted;
b) A Housing Evaluation Tool Kit based on the standards for CC and disaster-resilient socialized housing developed and applied;
c) Community and local leaders made aware of the agreed minimum standards through “Community Action Planning “ conducted in the (5) pilot barangays; and
d) Retrofitted vulnerable housing units in the pilot barangays based on the agreed local minimum standards.

2. Livelihood

a) Communities made aware of the vulnerability of their livelihood activities through “Livelihood Baselining “ activities taking into account seasonal impacts of climate change in select communities using baselining tools;
b) Livelihood plans/strategies in the pilot communities developed through “Barangay Profiling”; and
c) Select members of the vulnerable households trained on new adaptive skills through partnership with the Technical Skills and Development Authority (TESDA) such as on-the-job house retrofitting, food processing, etc., and provision of livelihood starter kits.

3. Environmental Management

a) Increased knowledge imparted among the communities and the City Government on implementing CC- mitigation responsive projects with focus on efficient energy use and
transport policy through the adoption of local policies on energy-efficient lightings and tricycle motor conversion;
b) Street lights replaced with energy-efficient lights adopted through an Executive Order; and
c) A policy or program on the conversion or replacement of 2-stroke tricycle engines to the more efficient and emission reducing 4-stroke motor engines developed and adopted by the City Government.

4. Climate and Disaster Risk Reduction

a) Working knowledge on CBDRRM and CCA increased in the pilot barangays through effective Information, Education and Communication (IEC) strategies such as social artistry programs/activities;
b) Ideal structural and facilities design of schools also used as Evacuation Centers (ECs) developed and agreed among local stakeholders;
c) Partnerships between and among the community, academe and the City Government on the care and retrofitting of schools used as ECs, forged through a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA); and
d) A community school cum evacuation center retrofitted based on the agreed ideal/modular design.

Approaches/Strategies
The implementation scheme adopted for the demo projects considered the participatory and consultative approaches to development. In the case of the Housing & Basic Infrastructure, for example, practitioners and stakeholders discussed and developed local minimum standards for socialized housing and “Community Action Planning for House Retrofitting and Site Planning”; the Livelihood Demo Project utilized the “Livelihood Baselining” and “Barangay Profiling” activities involving Barangay Officers and stakeholders to determine the vulnerability of their livelihood activities; the Environmental Demo Project conducted orientations and dialogues among different sectors on the different programs of the project such as the use of energy-efficient and environment-friendly lighting fixtures, tricycle motor conversion and best practices in environmental management; while the DRR Demo Project resorted to community mobilization and social preparation activities to increase community awareness and ownership of the various initiatives and interventions.

Each of the Demo Project has its own Information, Education and Communication (IEC) schemes to increase stakeholders’ participation, awareness, ownership and acceptance of the initiatives.

Capacity- Building and Empowerment
Corollary to the strategic approaches adopted to implement the project is the empowerment of both the project implementors and beneficiaries through local and international trainings. The quality and expertise of project implementors as well as the transformation of beneficiaries’ mindset from “dole-out” mentality to developmental and pro-active attitude have been identified as key ingredients to successful project implementation under the partnership. In addition to the various trainings conducted by the Consultants of the UN HABITAT, the project implementors as well as the project beneficiaries were exposed to trainings related to climate change, project evaluation, leadership and governance, community development, best practices sharing and benchmarking, development planning and other capability building activities.

Role of the City Government

As stipulated in the AoC, the City Government is mainly responsible for the implementation of the demo projects to include monitoring, evaluation and conduct of activities on ground. Each demo project has assigned lead person and support partners. It adheres to the participatory approach in the planning and implementation of projects and activities up to the community level. Its CC Project Office is responsible for over-all coordination of activities and initiatives as well as drafting and submission of periodic reports to the project principals. The City Government also involves its concerned Department Heads and other Officers in the respective Issue Working Groups (IWG) as counterpart to the over-all requirements of the project.

Financials

The total budget allocated to the project is P 9.5 M. Out of this fund, an amount equivalent to approximately P7.8 have been disbursed as of this date for both the (4) demo projects and general fund, pending payments for obligated/committed funds up to the project’s termination on December 18, 2011. The City Government has a total counterpart of about P4.2 M in line with the technical supervision (imputed cost of services) of its key technical staff for the 3- year period.
As expected, there are actual expenditures per budget item which exceeded the budgeted amount, while other budget items experienced minimal surpluses. These surpluses were used to offset other budget items which were “in the red”. Details of the financial report are incorporated in the Audited Financial Statements prepared by an accredited External Auditor.

Over-all Assesssment

Like any other project, the Climate Change Project implemented by LGU Sorsogon City has its own “highs” and “lows”. But on the whole, it is one of the few successful projects funded by foreign donors in the country. The Sorsogon Model is in fact recognized by the local and international communities. This can be attributed to the uncompromising leadership demonstrated by the LGU, the developmental assistance of the UN HABITAT, the cooperation and commitment of local partners and the active involvement and vigilance of the multi-sectoral stakeholders. One very significant impact of the project is the mindset transformation of Sorsoganons in general, from a “laid back” attitude to a pro-active and developmental consciousness. Another is the empowerment of the project implementors and beneficiaries through local and international trainings on climate change, effective leadership, project management, governance skills, community development, development planning, best practices sharing and benchmarking, and other development-oriented capability building activities.
Along the way, various setbacks and constraints had been encountered, but because of the tenacity and perseverance of the LGU leadership, the project implementors and the local stakeholders, the project was completed very satisfactorily “with flying colors”, as one of the international visitors put it. But we cannot “rest on our laurels” because there are still unfinished businesses especially with regard to monitoring and evaluation of “grassroots” impacts and replication of “best practices” generated by the project, in other areas.